Headlines

Bayern Munich Partners with Stryking for Blockchain-Based Collectibles

Bayern Munich, Germany’s most successful football club, has partnered with the blockchain-oriented venture of fan engagement firm, Stryking Entertainment. According to the agreement, Stryking, which is itself a subsidiary of Hong Kong-based Animoca Brands – a mobile games developer, will issue and distribute digital collectibles based on Bayern players.

Source: Bayern Munich Partners with Stryking for Blockchain-Based Collectibles

Why 90% of your streaming cash goes to acts you may not like

The 30% that most streaming platforms retain is quite reasonable for a hosting fee (and much better than the 85% commonly seen in record deals), and any service that raises subscriber fees is likely to lose users to its cheaper competition. Low royalty rates may also be down to the deals which acts signed with their record labels.

Source: Why 90% of your streaming cash goes to acts you may not like

Microsoft brought book burning into the digital age 

When Microsoft terminated its ebooks store — a service — it did not have to recall the books it had vended; instead, it terminated access to them. In essence, although the books continue to exist as intellectual property, those copies of the books just went away at the sole discretion of the provider, subject only to any contractual obligations.

Source: Microsoft brought book burning into the digital age — and you should be worried

Trading In Music’s Futures: Why Greed Is Good 

Major record companies have essentially always operated as mini-banks, providing an advance (which is effectively a loan) to artists in exchange for the rights to the music the artist releases. But now, actual banking institutions, hedge funds, and private equity groups are sniffing around the music industry, seeing an investment in music Intellectual Property rights as a safe bet.

Source: Trading In Music’s Futures: Why Greed Is Good (Guest Column)

How music publishers can prepare for Mechanical Licensing Collective Database 

Many music publishers are thinking that they will just let the MLC clean up their data for them. Theoretically, that works if you want to slow implementation and the flow of royalty monies to you and your songwriters. And in this era, data maintenance should be a core capability of any copyright-based company.

Source: How music publishers can prepare for Mechanical Licensing Collective Database | Opinion

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