Headlines

Pearson Puts Print Books to Bed

All future releases of Pearson’s 1,500 current U.S. textbook titles will be updated in digital versions only rather than in print, a shift from the traditional education publishing model. Pearson called the new program a “product as a service” model, adding that the intention was to have its textbook publishing program “be much more like apps, professional software, or the gaming industry.”

Source: Pearson Puts Print Books to Bed

Arm’s new licensing option lets its partners experiment and test for free before they pay

Intellectual property licensing schemes for chips may not strike you as the most exciting thing. But as the number of companies building their own silicon increases, often for very specialized use cases, having access to the IP from companies like Arm is something more companies than ever are looking to have.

Source: Arm’s new licensing option lets its partners experiment and test for free before they pay – TechCrunch

YouTube, Netflix surge in ranking of most valuable media brands

Google’s video-sharing platform YouTube and streaming video giant Netflix surged to the No. 2 and 3 spots in a ranking of the world’s most valuable media brands behind Disney. YouTube’s brand value jumped 46% to $37.9 billion, while Netflix’s value more than doubled to $21.2 billion, compared with Disney’s 40% gain to $45.8 billion this year from 2018, per an announcement that Brand Finance shared with Marketing Dive.

Source: YouTube, Netflix surge in ranking of most valuable media brands

Libraries Must Draw the Line on E-books, former ALA president says

Part of the problem here is that public libraries have little leverage with which to negotiate digital pricing and terms with publishers and vendors. With physical materials, our ability to buy and lend copies and to create rich collections for our communities is protected by law. In the digital world, however, we can’t license content without agreeing to the terms the publishers set.

Source: Libraries Must Draw the Line on E-books

Taylor Swift’s Story Is Indictment Of ‘Negotiating Asymmetries’

In this piece, former-RIAA executive Neil Turkewitz offers a different take on the recent Taylor Swift rights ownership incident, arguing against viewing it as an indictment of copyright, and rather as a reminder that the rules protecting creators’ intellectual property need to be easier to enforce.

Source: Taylor Swift’s Story Is Indictment Of “Negotiating Asymmetries” and Call For Copyright Reform

Deutsche Telekom loses lawsuit over all-you-can-watch video product

Deutsche Telekom has lost a legal battle to continue offering an all-you-can-watch mobile video product after a court sided with the German regulator, saying it violated European rules on roaming and network neutrality. Deutsche Telekom, Europe’s largest telco, had sought to emulate the success of its T-Mobile US business, which won market share in the United States by offering Netflix “on us”.

Source: U.K.

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