Headlines

Bologna Book Fair to Launch Virtual Rights Platform

Following the cancellation of this year’s Bologna Children’s Book Fair, the fair’s administrators, the BolognaFiere, are launching a series of new digital initiatives on May 4. These include a virtual book fair, complete with stages and exhibitions, and the Bologna Children’s Book Fair Global Rights Exchange, a platform that will offer opportunities for licensing and other business transactions facilitated through PubMatch.com.

Source: Bologna to Launch Virtual Fair, Rights Platform

Sacem unveils $6.7m fund and advances on royalties to help its members during Coronavirus crisis

Sacem says that the emergency measures include an “exceptional royalty advance” scheme worth up to €36m ($40.4m), a €6m ($6.7m) rescue fund for those most in need, and the addition of 1m ($1.12m) to an existing support program for publishers. The organization says that the operational arrangements for the emergency fund will be active as soon as Thursday, April 2.

Source: Sacem unveils $6.7m fund and advances on royalties to help its author, composer & publisher members during Coronavirus crisis

Neeta Ragoowansi elected as new President of the Music Managers Forum-US

Neeta Ragoowansi has been an entertainment attorney for over 28 years, having worked in-house at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, for the National Symphony Orchestra Association, and for the digital performance rights organization SoundExchange. She is SVP, Business Development & Legal Affairs for NPREX (National Performing Rights Exchange) and Artist Relations for RoadNation.

Source: Neeta Ragoowansi elected as new President of the Music Managers Forum-US

Is this the future of film? How to finish a shoot when the coronavirus strikes

Who says everything in the film business has ground to a halt? Some directors are finding ways of keeping the cameras rolling. When the pandemic halted his war thriller, Timur Bekmambetov popped his leading actor inside a video game and completed the shoot from 1,200km away. Will movies now have to be made this way?

Source: Is this the future of film? How to finish a shoot when the coronavirus strikes

The COVID Bounce: How COVID-19 is Reshaping Entertainment Demand

The economic disruption and social dislocation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is not evenly distributed. Some business face catastrophe, while others thrive. Across the entertainment industries the same is true, ranging from a temporary collapse of the live business through to a surge in gaming activity.

Source: The COVID Bounce: How COVID-19 is Reshaping Entertainment Demand

How The Coronavirus Will Transform TV Programming And Advertising

COVID-19 is spreading in the middle of broadcast networks’ program development season, wreaking havoc on this year’s ad upfront and global TV marketplace. The questions are, what will the upfront ad marketplace look like, and how will entertainment executives be able to cobble together a programming schedule at these virtual upfronts?

Source: How The Coronavirus Will Transform TV Programming And Advertising

Australia’s Broadcasters Foresee Savings From Canceled Sports Events

Australian broadcasters see the potential for significant cost savings in the current year, if major sports events are canceled and remain off air. Nine Entertainment said that it would save $80 million (A$130 million) of broadcast rights costs in the calendar year to December 2020, if the National Rugby League season is scrapped.

Source: Australia’s Broadcasters Foresee Savings From Canceled Sports Events

For the sports-entertainment business, coronavirus is taking a huge toll

For years, U.S. television networks have spent increasing amounts of money on “sports packages,” paying billions of dollars for the rights to show baseball, basketball and other sports exclusively. The exorbitant fees were justified because live contests offered a unique asset — unskippable real-time drama in the age of DVR. But that major virtue of immediacy is now proving to be sports-television’s great weakness.

Source: For the sports-entertainment business, coronavirus is taking a huge toll

Internet Archive offers 1.4 million copyrighted books for free online

One of the casualties of coronavirus-related social distancing measures has been public libraries, which are shut down in many communities around the world. This week, the Internet Archive, an online library best known for running the Internet’s Wayback Machine, announced a new initiative to expand access to digital books during the pandemic.

Source: Internet Archive offers 1.4 million copyrighted books for free online

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