Rights

Facebook parent Meta asks court to dismiss Epidemic Sound’s $142m lawsuit

Facebook parent company Meta is seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit filed by Sweden-headquartered royalty-free soundtrack provider Epidemic Sound about two months ago over the alleged copyright infringement. Epidemic Sound, which owns a catalog of about 35,000 royalty-free tracks and 90,000 sound effects, sued Meta in July, alleging that the social media giant “knowingly, intentionally and brazenly” stole music created by hundreds of musicians, songwriters, producers and vocalists.

Source: Facebook parent Meta asks court to dismiss Epidemic Sound’s $142m lawsuit

Music in the Metaverse: Redefining music rights in the Web3 world

Back in the early 1990s, when hip-hop artists were struggling to legitimize sampling, music industry executives tried to fit a square peg in a round hole by applying existing licensing criteria and terminology to a new field that they considered a “fad.” Of course, sampling only grew more popular, and eventually, a new licensing framework was created to accommodate it. Currently, we are having the same problem with Web3.

Source: Music in the Metaverse: Redefining music rights in the Web3 world

NFT Litigation Raises Novel Copyright Questions

Artists make thousands and sometimes millions of dollars selling non-fungible tokens, some of which feature celebrities or others. The artist may have protectable rights under the Copyright Act for their original work, but the celebrity portrayed in the NFT has competing publicity rights to control their name, image, and likeness. Whose rights prevail?

Source: NFT Litigation Raises Novel Copyright Questions

Senators Introduce American Music Fairness Act, Which Would Require Radio to Pay Royalties to Musicians

The American Music Fairness Act, which would require terrestrial radio to pay royalties on recorded music, was introduced by Senators Padilla and Blackburn. “This legislation will bring corporate radio broadcasters up-to-speed with all other music streaming platforms, which already pay artists for their music,” the sponsors said.

Source: Senators Introduce American Music Fairness Act, Which Would Require Radio to Pay Royalties to Musicians

Netflix Reduces Payments for Comedy Specials in Some New Deals

Netflix has become a major platform for comedians, funding an array of specials and delivering them to its audience of more than 220 million subscribers. Now, the streaming giant is changing how it compensates some of the comics it features, a move that could trim its costs and shift some financial burden to the artists, while giving them more control of their work, people familiar with the situation say.

Source: Netflix Reduces Payments for Comedy Specials in Some New Deals

Kobalt makes up with Meta: New deal struck to license 700,000 songs for Facebook

In a new memo sent to Kobalt clients in the past few days, Kobalt says that it has “been working with Meta on new licensing terms” since its previous deal expired in July, and that it is now “pleased to announce that Kobalt’s repertoire is once again licensed on Meta Platforms in the US.” The note adds: “You should expect to see your repertoire return to Meta’s platforms shortly.”

Source: Kobalt makes up with Meta: New deal struck to license 700,000 songs for Facebook

YouTube Wants to Make Music Licensing Easier for Video Creators

YouTube announced Creator Music on Tuesday (Sept. 20), a new digital storefront that allows creators to easily license popular music for use in their videos, generating revenue for them as well as music rights holders. YouTube already has deals in place with more than 50 labels, publishers, and distributors, including Believe, Downtown and Empire, to make “several hundred thousand tracks” available to license through Creator Music at the click of a button.

Source: YouTube Wants to Make Music Licensing Easier for Video Creators

What Is CC0? The Copyright Designation Buzzing in the NFT Space

While some in the crypto space are skeptical that the wave of profile picture (PFP)-focused NFT projects will remain relevant, many holders are hopeful about the potential long-term value of NFTs through intellectual property rights and a copyright designation known as CC0. CC0 is the most permissive of Creative Commons licenses. Under CC0, a creator can share content in its entirety for any purpose, even commercially.

Source: What Is CC0? The Copyright Designation Buzzing in the NFT Space

How Much Could Songwriter Royalties Grow? A Look at Three Scenarios

A handful of variables, including subscriber acquisitions, increased ad revenue and possible rising subscription costs, will create a multiplier effect that far surpasses the small increases in Phonorecords IV royalty rates. The same forces that built today’s music business are widely expected to continue for the foreseeable future. Streaming will expand as download and CD sales trail off.

Source: How Much Could Songwriter Royalties Grow? A Look at Three Scenarios

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