Headlines

YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers

YouTube is going after an alleged copyright troll using the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) provisions, alleging that Christopher Brady used false copyright strikes to extort YouTube creators, harming the company in the process. Now, YouTube is suing Brady, using the DMCA’s provisions against fraudulent takedown claims, seeking compensatory damages and an injunction against future fraudulent claims.

Source: YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers

Amazon Responds to ‘NYT’ Story Questioning Its Policing of Copyright In Its Bookstore

After a story in Monday’s ‘New York Times’ pointed to the availability of counterfeit books in Amazon’s bookstore, marking the second piece in two months on the topic, Amazon said the real issue has to do with differing copyright timing between countries.

Source: Amazon Responds to ‘NYT’ Story Questioning Its Policing of Copyright In Its Bookstore

Eminem Publisher Sues Spotify Claiming Massive Copyright Breach, “Unconstitutional” Law

In a suit filed Wednesday in federal court in Nashville, Eight Mile accuses Spotify of willful copyright infringement by reproducing “Lose Yourself” and about 250 of the rapper’s songs on its service to the tune of potentially billions of dollars in alleged damages. The suit also targets the Music Modernization Act, a federal law enacted last October that was intended to make life easier for tech companies and to get songwriters paid.

Source: Eminem Publisher Sues Spotify Claiming Massive Copyright Breach, “Unconstitutional” Law

Blockchain music-streaming service Audius gears up for public beta

A new streaming service with its sights set on making the middlemen of the music biz obsolete is inching closer toward its goal of disrupting the Spotifys and SoundClouds of the world. After a year of development, and armed with $5 million in investment capital from VC firms General Catalyst, Lightspeed, and Pantera Capital, blockchain startup Audius is finally ready to show the world what it’s been working on.

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YouTube Will Stop Letting Copyright Holders Seize Revenue via Manual Claims on Very Short Music Clips

Starting in mid-September, the video giant will forbid copyright holders from making manual claims to commandeer revenue generated by YouTube videos that include very short music clips (e.g., five seconds of a song) or “unintentional” music (like music from passing cars).

Source: YouTube Will Stop Letting Copyright Holders Seize Revenue via Manual Claims on Very Short Music Clips

Spotify, Amazon Make Case Against Royalty Board Rate Determination

Spotify, Amazon Music, Google Play and Pandora have filed their appeal of the Copyright Royalty Board’s mechanical rate determination, which will see music publishers and writers enjoy a 44% rate increase by 2023. The digital services filed their appeal late Wednesday in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Source: ‘Confusion & Inconsistency’: Spotify, Amazon Make Case Against Royalty Board Rate Determination

Why, in a post-Tencent/Universal world, the three major music companies are worth nearly $90bn

China’s Tencent Holdings Ltd. has made a bid to acquire 10%-20% of Universal Music Group, at a company-wide valuation for UMG of €30bn ($33.63bn). By default, this approach from Tencent has become the first market-tested barometer of what the strategic value of a major music company may be today.

Source: Why, in a post-Tencent/Universal world, the three major music companies are worth nearly $90bn

Tighten up that paywall! (And some other lessons from a study of 500 newspaper publishers)

New research suggests that most newspaper publishers with successful metered pay model strategies do better with higher “stop rates,” not letting a reader sample too much before they’re asked to pay up. “The publishers that reported more than 6 percent of unique visitors reaching their stop threshold had ‘thriving’ digital subscription businesses.”

Source: Tighten up that paywall! (And some other lessons from a study of 500 newspaper publishers)

Spotify Tests More Expensive Subscriptions as Labels Complain About Falling Per Listener Revenue

Spotify will test raising subscription prices in Scandinavia with an eye towards taking the increases worldwide, according to a new report. The test comes at a time when labels are complaining about falling per listener payouts from the steamer.

Source: Spotify Tests More Expensive Subscriptions as Labels Complain About Falling Per Listener Revenue

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