Headlines

Hidden fossils enter ‘digital museum’

A global effort to digitally record millions of fossils is set to transform the study of evolution. Museums including London’s Natural History Museum and the Smithsonian in Washington DC are involved. Digitally recording the 40 million fossils at the Smithsonian will take an estimated 50 years. But five years into the project, the team says it is “bringing dark data into the light” for crucial research.

Source: Hidden fossils enter ‘digital museum’

Internet court adopts blockchain to protect copyright of online literature

Writers publishing their work online can easily by hurt by piracy and it is hard to safeguard their legal rights due to difficulties collecting evidence. But an Internet court in east China’s Hangzhou now has a solution. Thanks to blockchain technology, the integral process of work circulating in cyberspace can be extracted for writers to use as evidence in court.

Source: Internet court adopts blockchain to protect copyright of online literature

Google warns of ‘unintended consequences’ of EU ‘link tax’ copyright reforms

Google’s head of news has warned that proposed changes to European copyright law will hit smaller news publishers hardest and “limit innovation in journalism”. Richard Gingras urged EU policymakers to “fix” what Google perceives to be the “unintended consequences” of Article 11 of the European Union copyright directive, which is in the final stages of becoming law.

Source: Google head of news warns of ‘unintended consequences’ of EU ‘link tax’ copyright reforms – Press Gazette

Netflix Original Series Viewing Climbs, But Licensed Content Remains King

Is Netflix moving fast enough to bulk up on originals to offset programming that’s about to get pulled by studios like Disney, Fox and WarnerMedia Original content accounted for 37% of Netflix’s U.S. streams in October 2018, up from 24% a year earlier (and just 14% in January 2017), per video-measurement firm 7Park Data. But that means the majority (63%) of Netflix’s viewing is still from licensed content.

Source: Netflix Original Series Viewing Climbs, But Licensed Content Remains Majority of Total U.S. Streams

FutureBook Wants to Make Books ‘More Compelling than Netflix’

At this year’s FutureBook conference in London, attendees from across the U.K. worked to determine to how publishers could compete with rivaling forms of entertainment. Though the day’s program flirted with how to capture new audiences (especially millennial men) with VR, AI, augmented reality, and 3-D spatial audio, it was most squarely focused on trends in downloadable audiobooks, voice technology, and podcasts.

Source: FutureBook Wants to Make Books ‘More Compelling than Netflix’

Sony Music launches its own streaming service in Japan

Sony Music Entertainment Japan (SMEJ) is partnering with Rhapsody International to launch what is being slated as the first on-demand, high resolution music streaming service in Japan. The new service is called Mora Qualitas, which will be powered by Rhapsody’s Napster platform, including all its systems, tools and APIs.

Source: Sony Music launches its own streaming service in Japan

Should Spotify Change the Way It Pays Artists?

One controversial study out of Finland, published in November last year and co-authored by multiple local music trade orgs, has sparked squabbles over this topic. Its key finding? In Spotify’s existing pro rata system, songs recorded by the top 0.4 percent of artists (in terms of overall popularity) got 9.9 percent of the money. However, when the “user-centric” system was hypothetically applied, those 0.4 percent of artists would have received just 5.6 percent of the total cash.

Source: Should Spotify Change the Way It Pays Artists?

Spotify Wants Appeals Court to Decide Who in Music Can Sue for Copyright Infringement

Despite the passage of licensing reform, the streamer still faces lawsuits with billions on the line. Many of those lawsuits that predated the new legislation are still being fought, and in one case, Spotify has just made a move that challenges who exactly can sue for copyright infringement.

Source: Spotify Wants Appeals Court to Decide Who in Music Can Sue for Copyright Infringement

Musicians Have Now Used Artificial Intelligence to Master Millions of Songs

When a song plays on the radio, there are invisible forces at work that go beyond the creative scope of the writing, performing and producing of the song. One of those ineffable qualities is audio mastering, a process that smooths out the song and optimizes the listening experience on any device. Now, artificial intelligence algorithms are starting to work their way into this undertaking.

Source: Musicians Have Now Used Artificial Intelligence to Master Millions of Songs – D-brief

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