Headlines

Citing Copyright Concerns, Getty Images Bans AI-Generated Content

The company cited “open questions” and “unaddressed rights issues” with respect to the content used by artificial intelligence generators. For the most part, it’s being scraped and remixed from the work of human artists, who use the Internet as a venue for their work to connect with audiences and potential buyers. Not only do some see this as disenfranchising to artists but it also presents legal quicksand for image sites that decide to trade in AI-crafted content.

Source: Citing Copyright Concerns, Getty Images Bans AI-Generated Content

Netflix: Analysts’ Views Improve, And It’s Now Forecast To Remain #1 In Global Subs

After seeing its stock price plummet 60% following two quarters of reported subscriber losses, things may be looking up for Netflix. Following its July announcement that it will launch an ad-supported tier, and its decision to move that launch up to November instead of waiting until Q1 2023, several analysts have upgraded their assessments of the stock.

Source: Digital News Daily: Netflix: Analysts’ Views Improve, And It’s Now Forecast To Remain #1 In Global Subs

Triller, Swizz Beatz, and Timbaland Settle Lawsuit Over Verzuz Pay

Triller has settled a lawsuit filed by Timbaland and Swizz Beatz, who claimed that they were owed additional pay for their sale of Verzuz. Though the settlement agreement’s precise terms haven’t been publicly announced, the deal presumably centers on Triller making additional payments to the Beatclub founder Timbaland and Swizz Beatz (who’s promptly resumed plugging Verzuz on his social media accounts).

Source: Triller, Swizz Beatz, and Timbaland Settle Lawsuit Over Verzuz Pay

White Supremacist Acts Are ‘Prevalent’ on Spotify, But Streamer Says It’s Working On It

Spotify is vowing to remove racist, anti-semitic and other hate content from its platform following a new report that says music from a number of white supremacist acts is “prevalent” on the service. The report, published by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), found a total of 40 white supremacist acts hosted on Spotify, violating the platform’s rules against “dangerous content.”

Source: White Supremacist Acts Are ‘Prevalent’ on Spotify, But the Streamer Says It’s Working On It

Could Spotify’s locked audiobooks model be a new way for artists to make money on its platform?

In diversifying its own content offering with yet another audio format alongside music and podcasts, Spotify may have unlocked a new way for artists to make more money from their fans on its platform. What if that artist and their team had access to a feature in Spotify for Artists that let them put a lock icon on a bonus track, making it accessible only to the fans who make an additional purchase?

Source: Could Spotify’s locked audiobooks model be a new way for artists to make money on its platform?

Amazon is tightening its ebook return policy to thwart BookTok

Amazon plans to limit automatic ebook returns to cases where people have read no more than 10 percent of the book, according to the Authors Guild. The change, which follows complaints that Kindle buyers were returning titles they’d fully read to get a refund, is expected to take place by the end of the year. In a press release, the guild blamed “BookTok influencers” for encouraging people to get “free” books by buying and then returning them.

Source: Amazon is tightening its ebook return policy to thwart BookTok

Senators Introduce American Music Fairness Act, Which Would Require Radio to Pay Royalties to Musicians

The American Music Fairness Act, which would require terrestrial radio to pay royalties on recorded music, was introduced by Senators Padilla and Blackburn. “This legislation will bring corporate radio broadcasters up-to-speed with all other music streaming platforms, which already pay artists for their music,” the sponsors said.

Source: Senators Introduce American Music Fairness Act, Which Would Require Radio to Pay Royalties to Musicians

Netflix Reduces Payments for Comedy Specials in Some New Deals

Netflix has become a major platform for comedians, funding an array of specials and delivering them to its audience of more than 220 million subscribers. Now, the streaming giant is changing how it compensates some of the comics it features, a move that could trim its costs and shift some financial burden to the artists, while giving them more control of their work, people familiar with the situation say.

Source: Netflix Reduces Payments for Comedy Specials in Some New Deals

Kobalt makes up with Meta: New deal struck to license 700,000 songs for Facebook

In a new memo sent to Kobalt clients in the past few days, Kobalt says that it has “been working with Meta on new licensing terms” since its previous deal expired in July, and that it is now “pleased to announce that Kobalt’s repertoire is once again licensed on Meta Platforms in the US.” The note adds: “You should expect to see your repertoire return to Meta’s platforms shortly.”

Source: Kobalt makes up with Meta: New deal struck to license 700,000 songs for Facebook

YouTube Wants to Make Music Licensing Easier for Video Creators

YouTube announced Creator Music on Tuesday (Sept. 20), a new digital storefront that allows creators to easily license popular music for use in their videos, generating revenue for them as well as music rights holders. YouTube already has deals in place with more than 50 labels, publishers, and distributors, including Believe, Downtown and Empire, to make “several hundred thousand tracks” available to license through Creator Music at the click of a button.

Source: YouTube Wants to Make Music Licensing Easier for Video Creators

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