Rights

Europol Seizes Over 30,000 Copyright Infringing Domains, But Which Ones? 

A coalition of international law enforcement agencies, including Europol, has announced its annual round of domain name seizures. Over 30,000 domain names were taken over this year, including some that were dedicated to online piracy. While these figures are impressive, no major pirate sites are missing in action.

Source: Europol Seizes Over 30,000 Copyright Infringing Domains, But Which Ones? – TorrentFreak

Stakeholders in Canada consider potential for planned blockchain copyright ledger 

The Canadian Artists’ Representation/Le Front des artistes canadiens (CARFAC) and Access Copyright are developing a blockchain system where artists can register their work and protect it from copyright infringement. The blockchain will assist in the tracing and tracking of visual works, but has the potential to do even more — like link to royalty payment services.

Source: Stakeholders consider potential for blockchain ledger as it nears completion – iPolitics

China using blockchain evidence for copyright infringement 

China’s internet courts are stepping up their use of blockchain to protect writers and creative content creators. This has mainly been beneficial to authors who publish their works online and have faced problems in safeguarding their legal rights owing to the difficulty in collecting evidence.

Source: China using blockchain evidence for copyright infringement – Ledger Insights

Educational Publishers File Suit to Block Sale of Pirated E-books

The country’s largest educational publishers have filed a lawsuit seeking to stop pirate sites from illegally selling their e-books and have won a temporary restraining order. According to the lawsuit filed in the U. S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, the pirate sites are selling unlicensed e-books using Google ads which they place in response to searches for the publishers’ legitimate content.

Source: Educational Publishers File Suit to Block Sale of Pirated E-books

Music Companies Don’t Want Copyright Profs to Be Heard in Piracy Case 

A group of major music publishing companies doesn’t want 23 copyright law professors to be heard in a piracy case. The scholars submitted a brief in the ongoing piracy liability lawsuit against ISP Charter, warning that a recent recommendation could harm both ISPs and consumers. However, the music groups suggest that not all profs are completely neutral.

Source: Music Companies Don’t Want Copyright Profs to Be Heard in Piracy Case – TorrentFreak

YouTube meeting EU governments to talk Article 17 implementation

It’s no secret that the approval of the European Union’s new copyright directive was not the end of the lobbying (and arguments). Article 17 (formerly Article 13) will now, like the rest of the directive, have to be implemented by each of the EU member states, and creative-industry bodies and technology firms alike are keen to encourage these implementations to sway one way or the other.

Source: YouTube meeting EU governments to talk Article 17 implementation

Millions in Crypto & Cash Seized in Movie Piracy Investigation 

Police in New Zealand have reportedly seized $6.7m in cryptocurrency and $1.1m in cash as part of a money laundering investigation. According to a local report, a man from Hamilton allegedly received the funds from a US-based movie piracy site he helped to create. PayPal noticed unusual activity on an account linked to the suspect and reported the case to the IRS.

Source: Millions in Crypto & Cash Seized in Movie Piracy Investigation – TorrentFreak

UK’s Society of Authors urges government to keep EU copyright law post-Brexit

Ahead of Brexit and the imminent General Election, the Society of Authors has called for a commitment from the next government to follow future EU copyright law and the EU’s Digital Single Market Strategy, and to remain within Creative Europe or else increase domestic funding for the arts.

Source: UK’s Society of Authors urges government to keep EU copyright law

 

Congress Introduces AM-FM Act to Get Artists & Labels Paid for Radio Play

New legislation introduced in both houses of Congress on Thursday brings artists one step closer to receiving performance rights royalties on radio airplay. The Ask Musicians for Music Act (AM-FM) would require radio stations to get consent from recording artists to play their music.

Source: Congress Introduces AM-FM Act to Get Artists & Labels Paid for Radio Play

Competing Publishing Industry Wishes, Concerns Give DOJ Plenty to Ponder In Consent Decree Review

Publishers, songwriters and performance rights organizations are at odds over other aspects of the DOJ’s consent decree review beyond the danger of potential unwanted legislation coming from the publishers’ request for the selective withdrawal of digital rights from ASCAP and BMI’s blanket licenses.

Source: Competing Publishing Industry Wishes, Concerns Give DOJ Plenty to Ponder In Consent Decree Review

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