Rights

Will Smith, Robert De Niro and the Rise of the All-Digital Actor

It’s not too difficult to imagine in the near future, say, a digital likeness of an Avengers star appearing in Marvel Studios’ ever-expanding big-screen universe in perpetuity, even if the actor has long moved on from the role. And who profits from these digital copies of actors will likely spark union debates as usage grows more common.

Source: Will Smith, Robert De Niro and the Rise of the All-Digital Actor

Millions of Books Are Secretly in the Public Domain. You Can Download Them Free

Prior to 1964, books had a 28-year copyright term. Extending it required authors or publishers to send in a separate form, and lots of people didn’t end up doing that. Thanks to the efforts of the New York Public Library, many of those public domain books are now free online.

Source: Millions of Books Are Secretly in the Public Domain. You Can Download Them Free

How a Swedish saxophonist built Kobalt, the world’s next music unicorn

How did a Swedish saxophonist from the 1980s transform into a leading entrepreneur in music’s digital transformation? Why are top technology VCs pouring money into a company that represents a roster of musicians? And how has the rise of music streaming created an opening for Kobalt to architect a new approach to the way the industry works?

Source: How a Swedish saxophonist built Kobalt, the world’s next music unicorn – TechCrunch

Facebook Offers News Outlets Millions of Dollars a Year to License Content

Facebook is offering news outlets millions of dollars for the rights to put their content in a news section that the company hopes to launch later this year. Representatives from Facebook have told news executives they would be willing to pay as much as $3 million a year to license entire stories, headlines and previews of articles from news outlets, the people said.

Source: Facebook Offers News Outlets Millions of Dollars a Year to License Content

Data-mining reveals that 80% of books published 1924-63 never had their copyrights renewed and are now in the public domain

Until the 1976 Copyright Act, US works were not copyrighted unless they were registered, and then they quickly became public domain unless that registration was renewed. The problem has been to figure out which of these works were in the public domain.

Source: Data-mining reveals that 80% of books published 1924-63 never had their copyrights renewed and are now in the public domain

Calls for an AI to be credited as an inventor

Two patent filings seek to set a precedent by naming an AI as their inventor. Law professor Ryan Abbott told BBC News: “These days, you commonly have AIs writing books and taking pictures – but if you don’t have a traditional author, you cannot get copyright protection in the US. “So with patents, a patent office might say, ‘If you don’t have someone who traditionally meets human-inventorship criteria, there is nothing you can get a patent on.’

Source: Calls for an AI to be credited as an inventor

Sony/ATV Reveals Major Upgrades to Royalty Payment Systems

Sony/ATV Music Publishing is improving the way it reports and pays royalties to its songwriters with a series of major upgrades. According to an announcement, over the course of the next year, the company will roll out significant new initiatives that will speed up how quickly songwriter earnings are processed and allow songwriters to get paid faster than ever before.

Source: Sony/ATV Reveals Major Upgrades to Royalty Payment Systems

Major Broadcasters Sue TV Streaming Nonprofit Locast

The 4 major broadcast networks have filed a lawsuit against Locast, a New York-based nonprofit that streams local broadcast programming over the internet. In their lawsuit, ABC, CBS, NBC Universal and Fox allege that Locast violates their copyright by retransmitting their programming without permission, likening it to Aereo, the TV retransmission startup that shut down in 2014 as the result of a similar lawsuit.

Source: Major Broadcasters Sue TV Streaming Nonprofit Locast

File-hoster ‘Instaudio’ Announces Shutdown Citing Legal Pressure

Instaudio, a file-hosting service specialized in audio, has stopped accepting new uploads. The site is shutting down completely in a few weeks. According to the site’s operator, rising costs, abuse from users and the associated legal pressure from rightsholders, are the main drivers behind this decision.

Source: File-hoster ‘Instaudio’ Announces Shutdown Citing Legal Pressure – TorrentFreak

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